Latest Nutrition News: August 2015

Latest Nutrition News: August 2015
Posted on Aug 05, 2015 by ntischool

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Latest Nutrition News: August 2015

by Aimee McNew, MNT

With constant nutrition and medical research happening, it seems like we’re always finding out that long-accepted things are now “bad” and things long maligned as bad are now “good.” How can you sort through the madness and stay on top of the latest and greatest in research? Here’s a roundup of recent news:

It turns out that a pregnant woman doesn’t really need to “eat for two” because the body anticipates the extra nutrient requirements and adapts. This is why digestion slows during pregnancy, thanks to a hormone known as relaxin. Pregnant women should focus on eating quality, whole foods during pregnancy, but not worry as much about increasing their caloric intake.

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_28-7-2015-11-30-23

Mainstream nutrition experts have decided that everyone is eating too much sugar. While the holistic nutrition world has long known this, more broader recommendations were recently released stating that sugar intake should not exceed more than 5% of daily calories. Of course, it’s really important to consider the sources of the sugar—refined sugar has absolutely no health benefits, where sugar sourced from raw honey can actually provide some antioxidant benefits in addition to its sweetness.

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jul/17/cut-recommended-daily-allowance-sugar-5-percentdaily-calories-report

More research proves that Alzheimer’s disease is “diabetes of the brain,” being strongly influenced by insulin resistance. The study discusses how important it is for the brain to receive consistent forms of fuel, and when the brain lacks fuel, memory suffers. As Alzheimer’s develops and progresses, the brain receives less blood sugar for fuel, and in turn, begins to use less and less. Preventive measures will become increasingly more dietary focused as those with a family history or other risk factors may turn to nutrition therapy and other protocols to help avoid insulin resistance, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150727130816.htm

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